therealbohemian:

Dust Nadav Kander

For Dust Nadav Kander photographed the desolated landscapes of the Aral Sea and captured fascinating images of the restricted military zones of Priozersk and Kurtchatov, which did not appear on any map until well after the end of the Cold War. Long-distance missiles were tested in Priozersk under great secrecy. Hundreds of atomic bombs were detonated in the so-called Poly­gon near Kurchatov until the program ended in 1989. The bombs were exploded in a remote but still popu­lated area, and covert studies were made of the ef­fects of the radiation on the unsuspecting inhabi­tants. Kander writes how the ticking of the Geiger counter on his belt while he photographed reminded him that he should not become too enthralled with the aesthetic and painterly allure of the crumbling ruins.” Text via.

Reblogged from therealbohemian

bonnielevinthal:

sogniesegni:

Kiki Smith: Just do your work. And if the world needs your work it will come and get you. And if it doesn’t, do your work anyway. You can have fantasies about having control over the world, but I know I can barely control my kitchen sink. That is the grace I’m given. Because when one can control things, one is limited to one’s own vision.

Kik Smith imparts such fine wisdom on making work

bonnielevinthal:

sogniesegni:

Kiki Smith: Just do your work. And if the world needs your work it will come and get you. And if it doesn’t, do your work anyway. You can have fantasies about having control over the world, but I know I can barely control my kitchen sink. That is the grace I’m given. Because when one can control things, one is limited to one’s own vision.


Kik Smith imparts such fine wisdom on making work

Reblogged from rhubarbinthegarden

gender-and-science:


"The Grand Prize went to a team of three 16-year-old girls from Ireland: Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey, and Sophie Healy-Thow. Their project, “Combating The Global Food Crisis: Diazotroph Bacteria As A Cereal Crop Growth Promoter,” explored different bacterial strains that could shorten the germination time of cereal crops like oats and barley. Growing food is becoming monumentally important, as climate change threatens food crops, and the increasing global population is becoming incredibly demanding.” - IFL Science

Always great to see teenage girls doing awesome things! 

gender-and-science:

"The Grand Prize went to a team of three 16-year-old girls from Ireland: Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey, and Sophie Healy-Thow. Their project, “Combating The Global Food Crisis: Diazotroph Bacteria As A Cereal Crop Growth Promoter,” explored different bacterial strains that could shorten the germination time of cereal crops like oats and barley. Growing food is becoming monumentally important, as climate change threatens food crops, and the increasing global population is becoming incredibly demanding.” - IFL Science

Always great to see teenage girls doing awesome things! 

Reblogged from gender-and-science